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Venda Pottery of Mukondeni

Venda pottery is one of the most distinctive types of traditional South African craft art, perfect in its elegant simplicity. The eye-catching dark brown pots, decorated with red ochre and silver graphite from Venda’s Lalonde Mountains, look beautiful in every setting. Originally Venda pots served as low-tech “fridges”, as the thick clay keeps water fresh and cool. Today the pots are used mostly for decoration.
 

Artistic Legends of the Giyani Area: Noria Mabasa and Johannes Maswanganyi

The Venda and Tsonga people are known for their rich artistic traditions, particularly in woodcarving, pottery, beading, embroidery, and textile-making. Although Venda and Tsonga art are historically utilitarian — woodcarving and pottery, for example, are used to make everyday items like utensils, storage containers, and cooking pots — many artists have built upon and enhanced their traditional skills to launch their work into the contemporary art world. 
 

Travel the Zoutpansberg Skirmishes Route with Author Charles Leach

The Anglo-Boer War (also known as the Second Boer War and the South African War) was a defining event in South Africa’s tumultuous history, and also played a crucial role in global politics at the turn of the 20th century. More than 100 years later, historians and amateur war buffs from around the world still travel to South Africa to explore the history and legacy of this devastating war.
 

Limpopo’s Finest Embroidery at Kaross Studio and Café

Kaross, derived from the Khoisan word for blanket or rug, is the name of an embroidery studio in Letsitele, Limpopo. But Kaross is so much more than that. For the past 30 years Kaross has not only produced some of the finest embroidery in South Africa, but has also provided a livelihood and source of cultural pride for hundreds, even thousands, of rural Tsonga women and their families. 
 

The Tsonga Kraal Open-Air Museum in Hans Merensky Nature Reserve

The Tsonga Kraal Open-Air Museum is a full-sized model of a Tsonga village, depicting the homestead of a real Tsonga chief — Muti Va Mutsonga — his eight wives, and his children. This homestead still existed as late as the1970s near the town of Giyani. Touring the homestead provides visitors with an idea of what traditional Tsonga culture and daily life would have been like a century ago.
 

The Arend Dieperink Museum in Mokopane

The Arend Dieperink Museum in Mokopane (formerly Potgietersrus) is housed in a 100-year-old stone building that originally served as a town school. The museum is named for local resident Arend Dieperink (born 1909, died 1986) who along with his wife Maria was a great collector of family heirlooms and historical objects and owned many of the items on display at the museum. The museum focuses on the history of Mokopane and its surrounds and includes a wide variety of Voortrekker and Sotho artefacts. 

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